Archive

Tag Archives: Architecture

While my family and friends in the States are enjoying the last sunrays of Summer 2014 this Labor Day, it’s Il Rientro here in Italy.

This time I am ready!

As I wrote earlier this summer, even after all the years I’ve lived here, I was still resistant to the European way of vacationing. I felt guilty and unproductive.

Well, I am happy to report that major progress has been made regarding my efforts to partake in the great Italian tradition of Dolce Far Niente.  I’m not completely out of the workaholic woods yet but these things take time.

I went to Siracusa, Sicily for my birthday, staying in the historic center called Ortigia.  The first two days the Internet in my apartment was down, which was a blessing in disguise.  I couldn’t obsessively check my emails or read news headlines.

When I arrived in Oritiga, I was a one big ball of stress.  By the end of the week, I was so calm not even the chaos at the Catania airport and my delayed flight could wind me up.

This calmness was short-lived as it ended by my first evening back in Rome but that’s a different story.

It was my first trip to this area of Sicily and just what the doctor ordered.  I didn’t realize how badly I needed a vacation until I had one. Yes, it was a short one but I still appreciated it.

The architecture, design, history, and culture were inspiring.  The food was on another level.  My friend and her family just happened to be staying at an apartment around the corner.

I will write more about my Sicilian adventures once I sort through all my photos.

It took a few days into my trip for my major breakthrough.  One morning I ditched my itinerary.  I kept my plan to jog along the seawall at sunrise, and then hit the farmers’ market after.  That was it.   I’ll be honest. At first it was an odd sensation to not know exactly what I was going to do the rest of the day.

When Erica called and invited me to lunch with her family at their place I said, “yes” instead of my usual freak out about impromptu plans.

It was a glorious day of having a delicious lunch with my friends on their terrace (which had this view),

IMG_7899

going to the “beach” (which was two block away),

IMG_8119

reading my books and magazines while drinking a lot of homemade Tè Freddo con Limone Granita,

IMG_8150

and enjoying the sweetness of doing nothing.

I went on to enjoy this sweetness several times during the rest of my trip.  I highly recommend it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My friends in Rome are probably sick of hearing me go on and on about wanting a terrace.

Well, that would be some of my friends who already have terraces.  I don’t think they appreciate how wonderful having a terrace is.  One friend rarely uses his.  I cannot understand this!  Trust, once I have my terrace I will be out there all the time, even in the snow.

Okay, that was an exaggeration as it snows here maybe once every twenty years or so.

I don’t need a huge space.  Nor, a pool.  However, if I had a chance to live in Keith Jacobson’s home, featured in New York Magazine, I would.

1

A penthouse with views of the High Line? Yes.

An outdoor kitchen? Yes.

A full bathroom with an outdoor shower?  Yes.

Designed by Francis D’Haene, founder of D’Apostrophe Design and his colleague, Patrocinio Binuya, this rooftop was almost too much for me to handle in my terrace-less state.

Yet, I still looked at the photos.

2

The landscape design was done by Miguel Pons.

4

Photos by David Allee

I’m glad they spared us photos of the cocktail bar.

 

 

I see the top of this church every time I walk across the piazza near my house.  Built from 1642-1660, it’s a classic work of Baroque architecture.  The architect was Francesco Borromini, aka arch enemy of Gian Lorenzo Bernini.

IMG_7319

Photo: me with my iPhone

While I am down for Bernini, it’s unfortunate that Borromini is not appreciated more. His contemporaries were perceived as being stronger visual artists. Borromini’s strength was more technical but that doesn’t mean we should overlook the beauty of his buildings.

Borromini was extremely difficult to work with and often depressed.  He committed suicide in 1667.

This church is just one of his masterpieces and it inspires me.

Buon weekend!

 

 

 

I’ve written before regarding how much I adore the collection Italian architect/furniture and interior designer Paola Navone has created exclusively for the American store Crate & Barrel.

Her new collection is out.  My siblings were kind enough to give me a gift certificate to Crate & Barrel and I had to get these glasses.

como-tumbler-glass-1

Now they are sitting at my sister’s house.   One day they’ll make it to Rome.

I love the color of the rim and the lines of the glass.  Very simple and very stylish.

I chuckle when I read articles telling tourists they can see Rome in a day.

I have lived here for six years and visited regularly for three years prior and I still haven’t seen everything this city has to offer.

One of the places on my list was the Galleria Doria Pamphilj .      Note:  Sometimes the name is spelled with a “i”.

I have been to the café several times but never to the museum.  Last week I finally went.

Bellissimo.  It’s the largest palazzo in Rome that is still owned by the family.  There are free audio guides (subject to availability).  Prince Jonathan Pamphilj’s narration is fantastic.  He really makes the rooms come alive and it’s very interesting to hear his stories about growing up in the palazzo.  Jonathan and his family live in one of the apartments on the upper level of the palazzo, as does his sister Gesine and her family.

There are over 550 works of art.   The Doria Pamphilj family has one of the biggest private art collections in Rome.   Fortunately for art lovers, the collection is opened to the public.

For me the highlights were the Caravaggios, the ballroom, and the Velázquez.

palazzo-doria-pamphilj-galleria-museo-roma-galleriaspecchi4 palazzo-doria-pamphilj-galleria-museo-roma-cortile7 palazzo-doria-pamphilj-galleria-museo-roma-salaballo3

Photos: Doria Pamphilj

DETAILS

Open every day from 9.00 a.m. to 7.00 p.m.
Last entry 6.00 p.m.
Closed: 25th December, 1st January, Easter.
We inform our visitors that the Palazzo Doria Pamphili is open to the public November 1st, April 25th, May 1st.

TICKETS

Full price: €11,00 (audio guide included – subject to availability)
Concessions or Groups, children and young adults between 6 and 26 years old: €7.50
Schools/ University: 5,00 €
Concessions for school groups with prior reservation by fax or e-mail : info@dopart.it ; biglietteria@dopart.it
All cards are accepted except Am.Ex & Diners

CONTACTS

Entrance: Via del Corso, 305 – Rome
Tel: +39 06 / 6797323
Fax: +39 06 / 6780939
E-mail: info@dopart.it
Website: http://www.dopart.it

I’ve written before about my fascination with abandoned houses.

On Via del Governo Vechhio there’s an empty palazzo that I’ve walked by many times.  Unlike some other big cities I’ve lived in, there are very few vacant buildings in the center of Rome.  So much so that they truly stand out.

One morning I noticed there were riot police at the end of the block.  The doors of the building were opened and there was a large group of protesters inside.  They were demanding that the county (which owns the property) renovate the space into affordable housing.  I doubt that will happen given the location, red tape, and costs.

Built in the late 1400s by Cardinal Stefano Nardiini, I had to check it out.

IMG_5868

I had no idea that this building was so large.

IMG_5856 IMG_5857 IMG_5859 IMG_5860 IMG_5867

I hope something wonderful happens with this space.  It’s a shame that it’s just sitting there, empty.

I’m always curious about abandoned houses.  I wonder who lived there and what happened to the house.

Renovating an old house, especially one that hasn’t been lived in for a while, is not an easy task.  Last week, two stories about two very different renovations were in the spotlight.

First up, the New York Times  wrote about the controversy surrounding the William Mason House in Thompson, CT.

APPRAISAL1-master675

Photo: New York Times

Famous interior designer Mario Buatta bought it twenty-two years ago.  The Mason house is a gorgeous example of Gothic Revival architecture and was built in 1845.

At first, people in the small town were excited that a designer like Mr. Buatta bought the home. They believed the home was in good architectural hands.  However, no work has been done in years.  The house has become a horrible eyesore and is falling apart.

Everyone knows historic renovations are tricky and things take time.  However, Buatta’s dismissive attitude has alienated the town.  He has worked on massive mansions four times the size of the Mason house which has thirteen rooms.

The house is located right on the village green.  I understand why the residents are not happy with the snobby and arrogant “Prince of chintz.”

Now for a more uplifting tale:

David Lebovitz linked to Messynessychic’s post about Australians Karina and Craig Waters on his Facebook page.  In 2013 the couple purchased the Chateau de Gudanes, an abandoned 18th century mansion in the Midi-Pyrénées.  The chateau had been on the market for over four years.

While many people dream of taking on a project like this, the reality is that the renovation and upkeep for a place with ninety-four rooms is enormously expensive.

720x479xchateau8.jpg.pagespeed.ic.0CU2kdobiT

720x480xchateau2.jpg.pagespeed.ic.GoYs4N5qNm

900x600xstaircase1.jpg.pagespeed.ic.f8hPvUJRZ8

900x600xchateaudoors.jpg.pagespeed.ic.S5TPt8LwDZ

Those stairs!!  The height of the ceilings!!

Click over to Messynessychic to see additional photos and learn more about the renovation.  I cannot wait to see their progress.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,001 other followers